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The German Bundesrat, the upper house of parliament representing the 16 federal states, is pushing for stricter laws against deepfakes. It has proposed a bill to protect personal rights from such realistic-looking media content, which is increasingly being generated using AI. The core of the draft is a new paragraph 201b of the German Criminal Code (StGB), which would punish the dissemination of computer-generated or altered recordings that violate personal rights with a fine or imprisonment of up to two years. Those who make such content publicly accessible or distribute deepfakes related to highly personal matters could face up to five years in prison. The Bundesrat justifies its proposal by stating that deepfakes pose "considerable dangers both to individual personal rights and assets and to the democratic process of forming opinions." The bill will now be introduced in the Bundestag, Germany's lower house of parliament, which will then decide on it. The government has previously acknowledged that instruments to combat AI-generated videos have not been sufficient so far and that action is needed.

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RX1 is a humanoid open-source robot that can be built for under $1,000. RX1, the first project from Red Rabbit Robotics, is a human-sized two-armed robot that can grip and place objects. It can be controlled remotely via a connection to a computer using machine learning or a VR headset. The project uses 3D-printed and commercially available components. With the RX1 Humanoid Servo, plans for the first component are now available on GitHub. More build plans, software, and instructions will be released in the coming weeks.

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Germany is a leader in AI research, but lags behind the US and China when it comes to translating it into products, according to an analysis by KfW. According to chief economist Fritzi Köhler-Geib, Germany is struggling to translate research into applications. Germany imports significantly more AI products than it exports and is becoming increasingly dependent on foreign providers, Köhler-Geib told DW. Germany also lags far behind China (29 percent) and the US (27 percent) in terms of AI patent applications (6 percent). Professor Alexander Löser of the Berlin University of Applied Sciences also sees Germany primarily as a customer for AI services from abroad. Many local talents would work abroad. Strict regulations also hinder access to training data. KfW and Löser call for better access to data, more investment in AI research and development, and more training opportunities.

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